Chapter __: How Literacy Affects the Settlement of Immigrant Women

Introduction

Maria MacMinn Varvos

Immigrant women have struggled with settlement and integration with varying levels of success. Their identity is tied to the status they left behind. The struggle to navigate through the new social system is often tied to their capacity to adapt to a highly literate environment. The challenges of the integration and settlement are compounded when they need additional English language and literacy skills.

The settlement challenges and strategies for the success of immigrant women with low first language literacy skills (LFLL) will be explored in this chapter.

This chapter will explore the relationship between adult literacy and second language literacy that relate to settlement and integration. This chapter will review lived experiences, sample program models, case studies, research studies and interactive reflective practice assignments. These elements will serve as the impetus for learning and skill development in this course.

Specific Learning Outcomes

By the end of this chapter, you should be able to

  • Integrate knowledge of the challenges of immigrant women with low first language literacy (LFLL) into your settlement practices.
  • Develop critical problem-solving strategies in clinical practice based on the settlement strategies presented in this chapter.
  • Develop strategies that would meet the needs of immigrant women with low first language literacy (LFLL).

Introduction to Chapter Study

Specific Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

  • Define the terminology that will be used in this chapter.
  • apply tips for navigating this chapter.

Glossary of terms

Test your knowledge:

  • Match the term with the definition. Find out how many terms you already know.

(Answer Key)

Terms

Definitions

  • First language literacy
  • Proficiency in reading, writing and numeracy in the first language acquired
  • Foundational literacy
  • First language literacy in reading, writing and basic math for everyday life
  • Native language
  • First language spoken and exposed to from birth
  • LFLL
  • Low first language literacy
  • L1
  • A learner’s second language
  • Adult literacy
  • An adult’s ability to read, write and do basic math
  • LESLLA
  • Literacy Education and Second Language Learning for Adults
  • ESL literacy
  • English as a Second Language literacy – ability to read, write and use basic numeracy skills for daily life in English.
  • Health literacy
  • “The cognitive and social skills which determine the motivation and ability of individuals to gain access to, understand and use information in ways which promote and maintain good health “(World Health Organization 1998).

  • CIWA
  • Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association
  • HIPPY
  • Home Instruction for Parents of Pre school Youth
  • Pedagogy
  • The art or science of teaching and development of instructional methods
  • Andragogy
  • The method and practice of teaching adult learners
  • Participatory Education
  • Focus on survival language skills identified by learners
  • BICS
  • Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills
  • Asynchronous learning
  • Distance learning on an individual schedule, within a certain timeframe.
  • Synchronous learning
  • Distance learning that a student attends virtually at the same time as instructor and classmates.
  • OECD
  • The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
  • ESL low literacy
  • Low level of first language literacy of learners of English
  • CCLB
  • Canadian Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks
  • UNESCO
  • United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization
  • LINC
  • Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada
  • Social Capital
  • How an individual interacts with and contributes to their social group by sharing similar values, individual skills, and solutions to the problems of the social network to which they belong, for example, Canadian society.

Scrambled Answers

Terms

Definitions

First language literacy

Canadian Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks

Foundational literacy

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization

Native language

Distance learning on an individual schedule, within a certain timeframe.

LFLL

The method and practice of teaching adult learners

L1

Focus on survival language skills identified by learners

Adult literacy

Distance learning that a student attends virtually at the same time as instructor and classmates.

LESLLA

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

ESL literacy

Basic Interpersonal Communicative Skills

Health literacy

Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada

CIWA

How an individual interacts with and contributes to their social group by sharing similar values, individual skills, and solutions to the problems of the social network to which they belong, for example, Canadian society.

HIPPY

The art or science of teaching and development of instructional methods

Pedagogy

“The cognitive and social skills which determine the motivation and ability of individuals to gain access to, understand and use information in ways which promote and maintain good health “(World Health Organization 1998).

Andragogy

Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association

Participatory Education

Home Instruction for Parents of Pre school Youth

BICS

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Asynchronous learning

Low level of first language literacy of learners of English

Synchronous learning

Proficiency in reading, writing and numeracy in the first language acquired

OECD

First language literacy in reading, writing and basic math for everyday life

ESL low literacy

first language spoken and exposed to from birth

CCLB

Low first language literacy

UNESCO

A learner’s second language

LINC

An adult’s ability to read, write and do basic math

Social Capital

Literacy Education and Second Language Learning for Adults

Tips for navigating this chapter

  • Make use of the links to additional information that will expand your reading and understanding of content and videos and will give a more personal connection to the content.
  • Start a journal to answer reflective questions. This is especially important if you are taking this course asynchronously.
  • If you are taking this course asynchronously, answer the reflection questions in your journal.

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