Resources Across All Disciplines

Indigenous Resources

Indigenous Resources

Alliance Building in the Academy and in the Community: The Role of Decolonizing & Indigenizing

This webinar recording is about activists discussing their experiences of relationship building with Indigenous peoples. They explore how relationship building has helped influence them to focus on decolonizing and Indigenizing within the classes that they teach. This webinar includes fifteen-minute lectures from each presenter, a question-and-answer period, and then a conversation between the presenters and the facilitator Dorothy Cucw-la7 Chrisitan (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Bloomfield’s Texts

This website presents the texts collected by Leonard Bloomfield in 1930.  The website contains links to over eighty stories that are written in both Cree and English.  Since these texts were part of the public domain, the Internet Archive made them available, but this new presentation represents another strategy to further collect, preserve, and make available these stories which is an endeavor that began nearly a hundred years ago. Leonard Bloomfield was a linguist who was commissioned by the National Museum of Canada to record stories from master speakers and storytellers which became the book that was published in the 1930s called Sacred Stories of the Sweet Grass Cree. Aaron Fay [who programmed and presented this website] is skilled at programming and at presenting information which has allowed these stories to be archived in this user-friendly fashion.  Information pertaining to Aaron was difficult to locate, but Aaron is likely Indigenous and the Cree Literacy Network states that Aaron is heavily committed to learning the Cree language (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: Public Domain

Building a Competitive First Nation Investment Climate

This textbook has been designed for those interested in First Nation and tribal governments building an investment climate that is strong and competitive. Topics within the textbook include introducing institutional and Indigenous economies. It covers the investment climate and transaction costs as well as how to establish property rights systems to facilitate investment and the legal framework that is necessary to support investment. Finally, it covers three elements of a competitive First Nation investment climate which are a fiscal framework, a building infrastructure framework, and an administration framework (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0

Chapter 11. Indigenous Languages in Essentials of Linguistics

This textbook chapter is about Indigenous languages. The chapter details how the settler government actively worked to endanger Indigenous languages. It also covers the importance of language in crafting Indigenous people’s identities. As well, it notes the skill sets that linguists’ can offer to help Indigenous Peoples in revitalizing and preserving their languages. It details preserving and learning the Mohawk language as well as learning about Mohawk culture. It also covers creating materials for teaching Mohawk and how speaking Mohawk is vital in reconciliation efforts (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0

Chapter 12. Indigenous Tourism in Introduction to Tourism and Hospitality in BC – 2nd Edition

This textbook chapter aims to educate about Indigenous Tourism. It explains what the socio-political context is currently for Indigenous tourism at both a local and global scale. As well, it explores how tourism is impacted by colonialism, the steps taken to uphold Indigenous rights relating to tourism, and how Indigenous tourism has evolved. It also teaches about how to strengthen Indigenous tourist businesses through understanding community and market readiness as well as the concept of authenticity and its challenges. Finally, it explores the significance of community involvement and partnerships and how this industry is valuable (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY 4.0

A Conversation with Dr. Jo-ann Archibald Q’um Q’um Xiiem: The Many Facets of Decolonizing and Indigenizing the Academy

This webinar recording is about Dr. Jo-anne Archibald Q’um Q’um Xiiem’s work in Indigenizing higher education. She explains different approaches for decolonizing and Indigenizing teaching practices as well as class curriculum. She also details some innovative approaches to teaching, learning, and research. After the presentation is a question-and-answer period (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

ECHO: Ethnographic, Cultural and Historical Overview of Yukon’s First Peoples

This open access handbook contains recent research regarding Yukon First Nations Peoples. It includes interviews with people who helped assist with research about the significance of community-based research. Topics within the handbook include a discussion on who the Yukon’s First Peoples are. It also details the archaeology of the Yukon’s landscape and ethnographic research of the traditional lifeways of the Yukon’s First Nations Peoples. As well, it details the Yukon First Nations Peoples relationships with newcomers and how their governance structure is set up.  It also includes a section on artistic expression and entertainment (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 (Note: This is an open access handbook, which does not allow for remixing or adaptation)

Economic Aspects of the Indigenous Experience in Canada

This text explores the economic history and potential of Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Includes: Summary, reflection questions, suggested activities

Financial Empowerment: Personal Finance for Indigenous and Non-Indigenous People

This textbook integrates Indigenous and non-Indigenous perspectives to educate about personal finance as well as financial planning. It uses information and examples that come from Elders, the economy, and the Canadian financial system. It is aimed to teach people how to assess financial risk, make sound decisions, and achieve their intended financial success. Topics in this textbook include learning basic skills, knowledge, and context. It also covers how to achieve your financial goals and how to protect what is important to you. Finally, it includes topics that help individuals plan for their future (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Healing and Reconciliation Through Education

This open educational resource is focused on teaching the history of the colonial legacy of Residential Schools, with an emphasis on exploring the unique history of the Shingwauk Residential School which operated in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. This project builds upon decades of archival research and data collection, including the recording of oral histories, under the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre’s (SRSC) mandate of ‘sharing, healing, and learning.’ ‘Healing and Reconciliation through Education’ is designed to increase the capacity of the SRSC to educate local, regional, and national audience about the history of Residential Schools.

Includes: Interactive map

Historical and Contemporary Realities: Movement Towards Reconciliation

The idea behind the creation of this open textbook is twofold. First, it is written as a resource for educators to teach students about the Indigenous historical significance of the lands encompassing the Robinson-Huron Treaty area and more specifically the Greater Sudbury and Manitoulin area. Secondly, through the use of interactive mapping strategies, the textbook will serve as a guide for educators to develop a similar resource to document Indigenous stories from their own areas. This open textbook is designed to be used at an introductory level to teach about social welfare issues within the Honours Bachelor of Indigenous Social Work program situated in the School of Indigenous Relations at Laurentian University. The material contained within this open textbook is broad enough that it can be used in other disciplines – sociology, education, law and justice, architecture, etc.. This text consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the gathering of Indigenous stories and their historical significance within the Greater Sudbury area. Chapters 2 – 5 are structured using the medicine wheel as its framework. Finally, Chapter 6 focuses on braiding Indigenous and Western approaches (Description from resource).

Includes: Learning activities, resources for more learning, maps

Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0

Histories of Indigenous Peoples and Canada

This textbook was developed to support a new history course at the Thompson Rivers University – Open Learning. The course was created in response to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the textbook discusses what the Indigenous Americas were like in the past. It then explores Indigenous commerce and diplomacy as European goods were introduced within the economy. Next, it unpacks our history of colonialism and how this contributes to the culture crisis as well as how it influences the challenges faced in changing this. It concludes with a chapter describing how we are just at the beginning of the Truth and Reconciliation movement (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence). Reviews are available.

Includes: Glossary

Licence: CC BY 4.0

Indigenous Information Literacy

This book outlines best principles for working with Indigenous print and oral sources in academic research. Topics include evaluating Indigenous print sources for credibility and authenticity, finding Indigenous authors, and respectfully working with Elders. Please note that while free to read, this resource is not licensed for editing or remixing.

Includes: Reflection exercises

Indigenous Speaker Series: A Conversation with co-founder of Sisters Sage, Lynn-Marie Angus

This is a recording of a webinar in conversation with Lynn-Marie Angus who with her sister, Melissa-Rae Angus, founded their company Sisters Sage. Launched in 2018, Sisters Sage sells modern self-care and wellness products that are made using traditional Indigenous ingredients. They discuss the unacceptable socio-economic gap that exists between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada and why it is so important to have Indigenous-owned and operated businesses. As well, they discuss the process of how they started their business and how they utilized Indigenous traditional ingredients in contemporary ways to create meaningful products (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY 4.0

Indigenous Speaker Series: A Conversation with TELŦIN TŦE WILNEW Instructor, Ruth Lyall

This is a recording of a webinar in conversation with Ruth Lyall. Ruth facilitates TELŦIN TŦE WILNEW: Understanding Indigenous Peoples at Camosun College, which is an award-winning course about Indigenous world view, colonization’s impacts, and how to develop new teaching and learning methods. In this conversation she shares her insights about Indigenous engagement in higher education (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY 4.0

Interrupting the Academy: Decolonizing and Indigenizing and What That Means to Curriculum

This webinar recording is about Indigenous scholars discussing their perspectives on the challenges faced when interrupting colonial practices in academia. They share how they have worked on decolonizing and Indigenizing classes by integrating Indigenous methods of teaching and learning. Presentations are given by three Indigenous scholars and then there is a question-and-answer period (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Knowing Home: Braiding Indigenous Science with Western Science, Book 1 and Book 2

From the description, these books are “far more than a set of research papers or curriculum studies. The project outputs include both, but they are incorporated into a theoretical structure that can provide the methodological basis for future efforts that attempt to develop culturally responsive Indigenous Science curricula in home places.” There is a focus on Northwestern North America. Reviews can be found on the Campus Manitoba website.

Includes: Appendices, examples, selected resources

Licence: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance: Indigenous Communities in Western Canada, 1877-1927

While not a textbook, this open book explores the means used to facilitate and justify colonization, their effects on Indigenous economic, political, social, and spiritual lives, and how they were resisted.

Living on the Land: Indigenous Women’s Understanding of Place

This edited volume examines how patriarchy, gender, and colonialism have shaped the experiences of Indigenous women as both knowers and producers of knowledge. From a variety of methodological perspectives, contributors to the volume explore the nature and scope of Indigenous women’s knowledge, its rootedness in relationships both human and spiritual, and its inseparability from land and landscape.

Memory and Landscape: Indigenous Responses to a Changing North

In this edited volume, Indigenous and non-Indigenous contributors bring together oral history and scholarly research from disciplines such as linguistics, archaeology, and ethnohistory. With an emphasis on Indigenous place names, this volume illuminates how the land—and the memories that are inextricably tied to it—continue to define Indigenous identity. The perspectives presented here also serve to underscore the value of Indigenous knowledge and its essential place in future studies of the Arctic.

Northern and Indigenous Health and Healthcare

The provision of northern health care entails many unique challenges and circumstances that are rarely represented in mainstream health sciences education. This textbook provides accessible content on health and health care from a northern perspective for the growing number of health professionals being educated in northern communities.

Includes: Reflection questions

Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0

Our Stories: First Peoples in Canada

Our Stories: First Peoples in Canada is a multimedia resource developed with Indigenous peoples from across Canada. Eliciting an unsettling of Western authority, this textbook encourages recognition that moves beyond a colonial lens. Please note that while this resource is free to read and share, it is not licensed for editing or remixing.

Includes: Images, videos

Pulling Together: A Guide for Curriculum Developers

This guide has been developed to assist staff members from post-secondary institutions in learning about respecting, honouring, and integrating Indigenous matters such as history, culture, and knowledge into their curriculum. This guide teaches post-secondary staff how to understand Indigenization, how to integrate Indigenous epistemologies and pedagogies, how to begin building relationships with Indigenous communities, and how to incorporate all of this into curriculum. It also assists readers in learning how to recognize one’s own role within the process of Indigenization and Reconciliation and how to best assist in promoting systemic change (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0

Pulling Together: A Guide for Teachers and Instructors

This guide is designed to educate post-secondary teachers about Indigenization, decolonization, and reconciliation with the goal of supporting systemic change. It will help teachers to locate themselves, explore Indigenous worldviews and pedagogies, integrate relational protocols ethically, and build an Indigenized practice (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0

Pulling Together: Foundations Guide

This guide aims to teach public post-secondary staff how to Indigenize their institutions and inform their own professional practices by broadening their knowledge about Indigenous Peoples. It provides information about Indigenous Peoples histories and cultures, examines colonization and its impacts, and explores the concept of decolonization and the challenges it faces due to institutionalized racism (Description take from Maskwacis Cultural College’s Indigenous Open-Source Annotated Guide licensed under a CC BY 4.0 Licence).

Licence: CC BY-NC 4.0

Pulling Together: Manitoba Foundations Guide (Brandon Edition)

The Manitoba Foundations Guide (Brandon Edition) is the first Manitoba adaptation of an open professional learning series developed for staff across post-secondary institutions. This guide is intended to support the systemic change occurring across post-secondary institutions and beyond through Indigenization, decolonization, and reconciliation.

Restoring Indigenous Self-Determination: Theoretical and Practical Approaches

This edited volume covers self-determination for Indigenous peoples around the world.

Shingwauk Narratives : Sharing Residential School History

The Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre (SRSC) holds 10 letter books of the first principal of the Shingwauk Residential School, Rev. Edward F. Wilson, and the fourth principal Rev. George L. King. These letters range in date from 1875-1904, and include a wealth of information about the early history of Shingwauk and Wawanosh. This open education resource shares stories compiled from the information in the letter books. Shingwauk Narratives discusses the in depth history of residential school, colonialism, and the establishment of the Shingwauk Residential School.

Indigenous Languages

Cree: Language of the Plains / nēhiyawēwin: paskwāwi-pīkiskwēwin

Cree: Language of the Plains is a comprehensive educational resource, offering a broad range of learning materials that is easily accessible to Cree language learners. This collection includes an updated and redesigned Cree language textbook, Cree language audio labs, and a Cree language workbook.

*Note that while this resource is free to use, it is not licensed for editing or remixing.

First Voices Languages

This is an online space for Indigenous communities to share and promote language, oral culture and linguistic history. Language teams work with elders to curate and upload audio recordings, dictionaries, songs and stories. Some of this content is shared with community members only, and some is shared with the broader public.

*Note that while this resource is free to use, it is not licensed for editing or remixing.

Little Cree Books

The Little Cree Books Project publishes short books for beginning readers in Swampy and Plains Cree.

*Note that while this resource is free to use, it is not licensed for editing or remixing.

Ojibwe People’s Dictionary

This online dictionary can be browsed or searched, and currently contains 17,000 word entries.

*Note that while this resource is free to use, it is not licensed for editing or remixing.


The Subject Librarian for Indigenous Studies is Bethany Paul.


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OER by Discipline Guide: University of Calgary by editors Sarah Adams and Ramina Mukundan with Libraries and Cultural Resources is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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